Where to Stay in Cudillero, Asturias: La Casona del Faedo

En la Casona de Ángel, queremos que Ustedes estén como en la casa de los abuelos,” Ángel prompted, reaching for my weekend bag. After five hours in the car from Madrid, I stretched my legs while breathing in mountain air and let the hotel owner carry my bag up wooden stairs.


If Ángel said he wanted us to feel like we were at Grandma and Grandpa’s house, we’d certainly make ourselves right at home.

Clinging to the edge of a teeny Asturian village, La Casona del Faedo had been a budget find on one of the busiest weekends of the summer, where hotel rooms were going for three times the 40€ we paid per night. Like many who we’d meet that weekend sitting at a picnic table next to the small bar, they’d been fooled into thinking that the Concello do Cudillero meant the hotel was located right in the heart of the fisherman’s village of the same name.

colorful Cudillero Asturias

After a car ride that snaked though the Gaudarrama region, the empty plains of Castilla and the green hills and mountain ranges of the Picos de Europe, I was delighted to recognize the N-632 road that I’d walked three years prior. Down the steep hill, rather than turning west towards Soto de Luiña, we veered left, onto a two-lane road that climbed into the foothills of the Picos.

Looks like we’d been fooled, too, but in the best way.

A half-blind, mangy dog sporting dreadlocks greeted us as we pulled the car into an overgrown strip of parking adjacent to a canary yellow house, built towards the end of the 19th Century. Chispa, a younger dog, shot by him and jumped on me immediately. The property owner, Ángel, set down a basket of eggs he was carrying and offered a hand before taking our bags and leading us into the galeria asturiana, a hallmark of old country houses in these parts.


The worn stairs alluded to the house’s history, rubbed thin and bowing in the middle. The second floor held several bedrooms: ours would be the one at the end of the hall, a room with a low ceiling, a wide double bed and an en suite bathroom. Truthfully, it did look like grandma and grandpa’s house. It was a little out-of-date, sure, but we aren’t travelers who spend much time in our hotel room anyway.

I freshened up, windows wide open and looking out onto the terrace bar, an old hórreo and acres of rain-fed pastures, while the Novio had a beer downstairs. After only six weeks in Madrid, the damp air took my hair back to its original shape and body. We’d spend a decent amount of time on that patio, opposite one another on a splintery picnic table. The Novio, with his beer, and me with a tonic water, chatting. The wi-fi signal here was weak.


Ángel and Agustina, his wife and the unrivaled matriarch of the house, are born and bred asturianos. The sort of salt of the earth people who take pride in their daily work and sing when they speak. They’d spent nearly two decades in the Canary Islands as bar owners before returning to their tierra natal to take over the old bed and breakfast.

Agu soon returned, a bounty of groceries spilling out of her arms. The fresh cheese would accompany our bread the next morning, the eggs whisked to coat croquetas – but the pale green fabines were hers to stew with clams.


Every morning and afternoon, post-siesta, we’d descend the mountain in our rental car and explore the region – Playa del Silencio, the weekend markets at Pravia and Muros de Nalón, a family-run sidrería on a lonely road in a town whose name I’ll never remember. And Agu and Ángel were always there when we returned – in the kitchen and behind the bar, respectively.

On our last day, me teetering on the edge of 30 and 31, the hotel owners informed us we’d have to move rooms due to a glitch in their new booking site. “No pasa nada,” I said. “Growing pains.” We gathered our things that morning and left them by the door. We were rewarded with an upgraded room and an invitation to have dinner, on the house.

Our bags were set near the bed when we arrived back from the Concha de Arvedo beach that afternoon. More coquettish and with a breeze, we’d have to close the ancient wooden shutters that night when a storm rolled through the Concello.



There was a murmur in the adjacent dining hall when we arrived, and Ángel had saved us our picnic table. “Señores, qué les apetece para cenar?” He began to list off whatever his wife was fabricating in the kitchen, but the Novio just replied, “Whatever is good.”

We filled up on cheese from somewhere across the valley, crumbling cabrales and fresh goat quesu, spread across bread that had been baked that afternoon. The croquetas were clearly homemade, lumpy and bursting with bechamel sauce and hints of leeks, and the pollo al chilindrón practically fell off the bone.

As if the location of the Casona wasn’t enough of a privilege, the food and the company was beyond what we expected from a budget bed and breakfast. It was one of those places where faces become familiar over breakfast, where the mini fridge is stocked with cans of Coke and whatever you’d picked up at the market that morning, and you’re greeted with a drink as soon as you’ve arrived.


If you go: La Casona del Faedo is a small, rural homestay located about 6 miles due south of Cudillero and reachable only by car. From Oviedo, take the A-8 to exit 431. Follow the N-632 for 1.5 kilometers and, at the bottom of the mountain, turn left onto the CU-4. The town of Faedo is seven kilometers along. You can reserve on Booking.com for around 50€.

Read more about our Asturias road trip!

I was not paid in any way for this article, save genuine hospitality on behalf of the owners. All opinions are my own.


Do you have any recommendations for Cudillero or Asturias?

Where to Sleep and Siesta in Seville: The Hostel Edition

One of the questions I’m most often asked about traveling to Seville is where to sleep. I’ve slept in my own house or a friend’s (or the Novio’s) since arriving and can only recall a night in a creepy hostel, so it’s not the easiest question to answer!

On my first trip to Seville over a decade ago, the only spaces available for budget travelers were seedy hostels with questionable security and run-down pensiones. Ten years on, tourist apartments and AirBnB digs are often preferred accommodation choices in Spain, but who can resist a good hostel? When traveling alone, I tend to stick to dorm room digs where I can meet other backpackers, mostly because I love the sort of camraderie a hostel breeds.


For me, it was more than just a budget thing (as evident by a few terrible places I’ve slept in *cough*Brussels*cough*Santiago de Compostela*) – I wanted to be in the center of the action and have people on-call to suggest tours, eateries and sites. I’ve even taken my step-grandma and the Novio to hostels, and am loyal to chains like Wombat’s.

Now in my 30s, hostels for me must have big common areas, wi-fi, security measures and clean facilities, and endless portions at breakfast is a huge plus. And because Seville has so many stately palace homes with rooftops and enormous interior patios, I’m thrilled that the Andalusian capital has finally kicked it up a notch as far as place to siesta while in town.

I’ve asked other travelers and friends for their recommendations, as well as where locals send their guests, so this list is legit. You can book with Agoda, a major search engine that recently expanded into Europe and offer up to 30% off the prices you’d see on other sites – I do all of my booking through them nowadays! Simply click on the link for the hostel, then put in your dates and number of guests, or direct yourself to the Agoda box buried at the bottom of the website.

I have listed Sunshine and Siestas affiliate links with Agoda, so while you book securely and quickly, you’ll also be helping me keep SandS up and running! It’s of no cost to you, either.

Here are my ten picks for hostels in Seville, listed alphabetically.

arhcitect hostel seville


The Architect, Calle Joaquin Guichot 8 1ª Planta. Centro Neighborhood.

When a couple of friends from high school stayed in the Architect in 2012, I was pleased to not only find that my friend María had recently gotten a job there, but that the hostel was sleek and central. While it’s experienced some wear and tear since its opening, expect to be right off of Plaza Nueva and to get good bang for your buck.

And even though I love hostels with breakfast included, the Architect no longer provides it. Pop around the corner to Calle Barcelona for old man bars to get your tostada fix.

The basics: The Architect has rooms with four, eight or ten beds, including a female-only dorm. You’ll find a common area, plus kitchen and rooftop, plus wi-fi throughout. Each occupant gets a locker, and doors are locked at night. You’ll receive a full refund  if you cancel 48 hours or more before your reservation.

Price per bed: 16 – 17,50€ in low season; up to 50€ in high season. There are no doubles.

Best for: Limited mobility travelers, those looking for comfort without fuss.


Boutike, Calle Salles y Ferré, 18. Alfalfa Neighborhood.

Boutike takes all of the great stuff about hostels – comfortable common areas, rooftop terrace, killer breakfasts and beautiful design – and morphed it into a gorgeous budget hotel of sorts. Sitting on a quiet street in the Alfalfa neighborhood, Boutike doesn’t have dorm rooms, but rather double rooms with en suite bathrooms, making it a good choice if you’re looking to get some shut eye in a neighborhood known for its nightlife.

And there’s more – Boutike also offers complimentary passes to Cuesta Sport fitness center, just a five minute walk from the hostel. You know, to work off the crepes you had for breakfast.

The basics: You’ve got everything here – wi-fi, elevators, walking tours and a friendly staff – plus the added amenities of a bar, breakfast and fitness pass. Luggage storage and lockers are also available for free.

Price per bed: Standard doubles are 49.50€ per night in low season, Deluxe with balcony 55€. During high season, prices jump to about 120€ nightly.

Best for: Families, travelers who crave a bit more quiet, couples.

grand luxe hostel seville common room 1

Grand Luxe, Calle Don Remondo, 7. Santa Cruz Neighborhood.

Housed in a beautiful, palace-like building, Grand Luxe is all about location. As in, you can see the Giralda peeking out from behind the Archbishop’s Palace from most of the rooms, and the terrace affords magnificent views. And even with the proximity to the beaten tourist path, Grand Luxe offers tours to give you context – and by kayak, bike and foot!

Like all hostels, you’ll find everything you need at Grand Luxe, plus a cozy common room with computers, board games, a huge DVD collection and plenty of like-minded travelers. What stands out here is the price for the location – you can’t beat a modern hostel amongst hotel heavyweights that charge loads for being within earshot to the Cathedral’s bells.

The basics: Grand Luxe has several types of rooms, ranging from private doubles to rooms equipped for families and dorm rooms, all with en suite bathrooms. There is also a female-only dorm. A basic breakfast is included (save room for tapas later), along with wi-fi, a stunning terrace and free tours. Security isn’t great here, especially if you have to leave a bag while exploring.

Price per bed: Dorms start at 15€ in low season and go up to 25€ per person in the deluxe double. In high season, expect 35€ and 49.50€, respectively.

Best for: travelers wanting to be right next to the tourist sites, solo travelers and even families.



Hostel One Centro, Calle Angostillo, 6. Encarnación Neighborhood.

While it’s not a new hostel in town, I hear nothing but good things about Hostel One. With an international staff and a national chain backing it up, Hostel One is a perfect blend of camaraderie and privacy thanks to its multitude of rooms available. Be aware that reception is not open from 10pm until 8am and breakfast is not part of the deal, but you can expect the whole hostel package – a bit of noise, a lack of complete privacy in the dorm rooms and a lot of travelers to meet.

You’re also closer than most hostels to the trendy Soho Bendita and Calle Regina areas, and the hostel is easy to reach from the airport and train station.

The Basics: Hostel One Centro is located in a renovated Sevillian house with a central patio and terrace. Prices are on par with hostels, and group rates are available. Linens, wi-fi and lockers are included in the price; towels and breakfast are not.

Price per bed: 16 – 50€ per bed during low season; 60€ for dorm beds up through 100€ for a private single during holidays.

Best for: Larger groups, solo travelers, female travelers looking for privacy

la banda hostel

La Banda, Calle Dos de Mayo, 16. El Arenal Neighborhood

I first swooned over La Banda when coming across them on the internet. From the story of two brothers who loved to travel and meet people to the sweeping views of the Guadalquivir and the Cathedral, it seemed like everything you could ask for in a hostel. Dorm room bed are kept to a lower number, but there are plenty of common areas and nightly events for solo travelers.

The Basics: La Banda features lots of different types of dorms, some with en suite bathrooms. Everything is included in the price – from lockers to linens to cheap lunches on the terrace. And seriously – La Banda has dozens of five-star ratings.

Price per bed: 40€ during Semana Santa, Feria and the Velá de Santa Ana in late July

Best for: Travelers looking for mates, art and culture lovers

oasis backpackers


Oasis Backpackers, Calle de la Compañía, 1. Centro/Encarnación Neighborhood.

I spent the last night of my first year of Spain in an Oasis. It was a fitting end to a magical time in my life, from the tapas crawl with other travelers to the solo breakfast on the terrace as the sun came up over Granada, and I’ve recommended the chain ever since. In Seville, Oasis is just off the Plaza de la Encarnación and has been a mainstay for the last dozen years or so.

Oasis is great for not just the value, but for the location and the amenities. The atmosphere is young and hip, but you won’t sacrifice quality or security.

The Basics: Count on free breakfast and linens, a fun staff and wi-fi in common areas. Note that cancellations with full refunds are not allowed during Holy Week and the April Fair.

Price per bed: 17€ a night, off-season and upwards of 40€ during big events.

Best for: Solo Travelers, Travelers looking for atmosphere.

samay hostal

Samay, Avenida Menéndez Pelayo, 13. Barrio Santa Cruz Neighborhood.

A bit further away from the tourist beat, Samay has built a solid reputation amongst travelers and is located on the outer edge of Barrio Santa Cruz. It’s also centrally located to both the bus and train stations and easy to reach on foot or public transportation, making it a good option for a quick stay in town or for those with weird travel times.

Samay has en suite bathrooms in most rooms and great common areas, but it’s a no-frills hostel that prides itself on no surprises. You can simply relax and meet other travelers here.

The Basics: Expect 24-hour reception, wi-fi, a big terrace, hot water and linens included. Seriously, there are no surprises here, and friends who have stayed in Samay say it’s comfortable and a basic hostel experience. Wouldn’t you rather spend your time callejando anyway?

Price per bed: You can’t beat 12€ a night for a dorm room. Prices are set around 30€ during high season and holidays.

Best for: No frills travelers, groups



Sevilla Kitsch, Calle San Gregorio, 1. Centro Neighborhood.

I walked by Sevilla Kitsch when taking a short cut between the university and the UNESCO trio of the Alcázar, the Giralda and the Archivo de las Indias. The bright, turquoise shutters and the promise of tacky religious art intrigued me – it’s part hostel, part art gallery and completely new.

The Basics: Kitsch is owned by two sevillanas who love art and culture, and the property has plenty of places to eat, drink and tour nearby. Expect dorm rooms (with one six-bed female dorm) and a deluxe room with room for four guests. Breakfast, wi-fi, lockers and a spacious terrace are all included. Oh, and live music is a thing here.

Price per bed: From 17.99€ for a bed in a dorm room in low season and 60€ for the deluxe quad, prices jump during high season to 35€ and 150€, respectively

Best for: Solo travelers, those looking for funky digs


TOC Hostel, Calle Miguel de Mañara, 18-22. Centro Neighborhood

TOC is the new kid on the hostel block and draws high review thanks to its location and staff. No detail has been spared in the earthy yet modern hostel – the design is stunning, from the bare wood and natural materials to the fingerprint recognition at the main door. And those pod beds and move theatre!

TOC is part of a chain with other hostels in large cities around Spain, and they’re into food, culture and technology, which comes across in their spaces.

The basics: Choose dorm or individual suites and relax in what look like beds comfy enough to rival Sir Toby’s (my favorite hostel of all time, located in Prague). Count on a bar, breakfast (that you can pay for ahead of time) and awesome common areas.

Price per bed: 20€ and up for a dorm; 113€ for a private with terrace

Best for: Trendsetters, couples, groups and solo travelers. Essentially, everyone



Triana Backpackers, Calle Rodrigo de Triana, 9. Triana Neighborhood

Even though Triana is one of the most popular districts in the city, it’s not a common place for tourists to stay. Triana Backpackers is the only budget accommodation in this part of town that also offers special prices for pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago. While it’s not the trendiest hostel, it’s long had a reputation for a fun atmosphere and is just steps from Calle Betis (and, as far from the tourist sites as it seems).

And, um, they have jacuzzi.

The basics: Like most hostels, a converted home on a quiet street in my favorite neighborhood (it’s only a few block from my house!). Security is of huge importance at Triana Backpackers – rooms have keycard access like a hotel -, and you’ll likely be rubbing elbows with really budget travelers. Breakfast and linens are included, as is wi-fi and 24-hour reception.

Price per bed: Prices start at 15€ for a dorm room bed or 19€ for a double

Best for: Solo travelers, Camino de Santiago pilgrims

Any great hostel experiences you’d care to share? Did I miss any? Or am I way off-base with his post? Let me know in the comments below!

A Weekend at Trujillo Villas

I spent two nights sleeping next to Francisco Pizarro. Well, next to the house where the Conqueror of Peru grew up on the hardened plains of Extremadura in a small town called Trujillo, not actually with him (he died almost 500 years ago in Lima).

Trujillo has always loomed from the A-5 highway towards Madrid, castle and ramparts rising from an empty extremeño plain. Noted for its medieval stone village, impressive Plaza Mayor and cheese smelly enough to make you think you’re eating feet, it was one of the places on my 2014 Spain wish list. Spending a weekend at Trujillo Villas, a series of luxury rental villas in the heart of Trujillo’s old town, was the perfect invitation to return to one of Spain’s most up-and-coming areas after four years.

Angela greeted us at the parador after we’d spent the afternoon in nearby Guadalupe; we showed up nearly an hour late. She was chipper as she showed us through the village, navigating ancient streets while pointing out places to eat. Yeah, we’d get along alright. The Novio was pleased to learn that our digs for the night, the Artists Studio, was two doors down from the childhood home of Pizarro.

For European travelers who forget that there’s a Spain away from the coasts, Trujillo Villas offers vacation homes and luxury, self-catered holiday properties in one of Spain’s undiscovered regions.

The building

Right off of Plaza los Moritos, the family built an open, contemporary space well-suited for a couple. The next door neighbor came to greet us each time we passed, his gaping smile (and the lamb his wife seemed to always have in her arms) just as warm as the car and service we received the whole weekend. 

The villa is just a few minutes’ walk from the Plaza Mayor, the castle and other major sites around town. Rectified from a pile of rubble, the Artist’s Studio can comfortably sleep up to four people, thanks to its sofa bed, and it’s suited for a quick city break or a longer stay in Trujillo. It’s modern, yet romantic.

The open concept main floor

Modern, airy and decorated with artists in mind, the Artist’s Studio’s mezzanine level is open from the front door all the way to the back door, which opens to a private terrace.

A small desk was a perfect spot to set up my laptop during siesta hours while the Novio camped out on the couch with the TV on. The unit is air-conditioned, but also has a pellet-burning eco fireplace, which was perfect for the chilly March nights where the wind seemed to whip right past the house.

I loved the detailing that alluded to the region in which Trujillo lies – the water fowl, the local products – as well as the blank canvases and easels, begging to be used. Angela and her family run self-catered trips that focus on cooking, painting and walking holidays, evident from even the paintbrushes that hung from beneath the mantle.

The bedroom and bathrooms

I hadn’t even taken my coat off when I climbed the metallic and glass stairs to the bedroom and bathroom on the second floor. We’d been up all afternoon driving and touring, so I needed to test out the comfort factor of the bed:

Yep, I could sleep here easily.

What blended well within the Artists Studio was its Old English Manor House comfort meets modern, open apartment.  The only doors in the place led to the outside or to a bathroom, so the whole place felt communicated and airy.

I could read while in bed, draw the curtains and listen to the Novio watching an old episode of Aída while I drifted off after a day or exploring Yuste and Garganta la Olla. 

The terrace

At the rear of the house, there’s a refurbished stone terrace with patio chairs, loungers and even a rainforest shower (lack of room for a pool, says Angela) with uninterrupted views of the northern extremeño countryside.

Late March was still cool and breezy, so we didn’t get to make any use of the inviting terrace. Some sort of party was raging all day Saturday, so I took a glass of wine out to watch the sun turn the nearby castle ruins light up golden and listen to Gangnam Style.

The specifics

Apart from the care Angela took in making sure we were looked after, the Novio and I were delighted to find a welcome pack the included a few bottles of local wine, fixings for breakfast and fresh lilies on the kitchen table.

Every appliance in the house was explained thoroughly, and Angela left maps of Trujillo and the region, information for day trips and things to do around town. There was plenty of logistical information for long-term stays, like where to get groceries or even play a round of golf – it’s evident that the Gartons love Trujillo and the weathered plains that surround it.

Our first question? Where to eat. Angela dutifully pointed out her favorite eateries around the city, clustered around Plaza Mayor and its labyrinth streets in the old city and even joined us for breakfast before check-out.

What I loved about our stay with Trujillo Villas – not counting the top-notch service and beautiful lodgings – was that we could explore the city leisurely and were staying in a rental villa with character in a town that had no lack of it. We spent more time than normal just relaxing in the Artists Studio and taking advantage of the space.

While we didn’t make it to the small museum around the corner, we did see the great city that Pizarro and Orellana built with the riches from the New World. I felt more local by forgoing the hotel option, and don’t think Trujillo would have felt so cercano and accessible if we’d stayed in one of the motels off the A-5 highway. 

My stay was graciously provided by Trujillo Villas for winning their Food Blogging contest with a post about my most memorable Spanish meal. All opinions are my own. Bookings at the Artists Studio start at £110 per night, and a minimum of three nights must be booked. If you’re interested in staying with them or in finding out about their package holidays, point your browser to their homepage

Have you been to Trujillo?

Seville: Perfect for a Fall City Break

Earlier this week, my friend Mar and I were enjoying a light breakfast (read: an entera with Iberian ham and tomatoes) in a small plaza right of Constitución. Our bare arms caught the morning chill as we chowed down, surrendering to the fact that Autumn has snuck up on us.

photo by kelly m. holland

Fall is one of my favorite times in Seville – expat celebrations, the return to school and snuggling on chilly mornings for just a few minutes more (dios I sound like an abuela). When friends talk about coming to visit, I tell them that Seville is perfect for a holiday city break during this season:

Cheaper Accommodation and Flights

Look up any flight to Seville come October and want to hug your computer. I mean it. Not only is it cheaper to get to Southern Spain (or anywhere in Europe), but the hotels are a bargain, too. Using sites like Hotel Scan will net you savings of about 30-40% on average, making Seville a bargain for a long Fall weekend.

Do be aware that October 12th is Día de la Hispanidad (Spain’s take on Columbus Day when the Catholic Kings get most of the glory) and November 1st is Día de Todos los Santos Difuntos (don’t forget to eat your huesos de santos!), so hotels typically up their prices a weeeee bit.

A Multitude of Festivals

Seville and the surrounding cities hosts several different fairs during this time, including the Feria de Jamón in Aracena (Huelva), the Salon International del Caballo in tribute to the Andalusian horse breed and the biannual Flamenco celebration.

You can also take great hikes around the province, gather mushrooms and acorns in the Sierra Norte and Aracena and escape to the beaches without all of the crowds.

Less tourists, less lines

For whatever reason, there’s always loads of tourists in Seville when the weather is at its hottest. They flock the central part of town and fill the bars near the cathedral, but these tourists have also made the city one of the top destinations in Spain. This is great news for the local economy, but it also means you’ll wait in line at the bank and the Corte Inglés and even eating out can mean a wait for a table.

Opening hours are typically shortened in the afternoons, so take advantage of the early hours for sightseeing, and then use the afternoon to stroll off a huge lunch. Sandra of Seville Traveler made a perfect itinerary that’s catered towards the non-touristy months in the city.

Um, it’s not sweltering anymore, either.

Yeah, that’s the other thing – you can actually enjoy roaming the streets around Santa Cruz and Triana while still dining outdoors or having a drink at a terrace bar. temperatures are, on average, around 22 degrees in October by midday, cooling off in both the shade and at night so that you can actually sleep and not waste hours tossing and turning because it’s so freaking hot.

Fall is perfect in Seville, and even as I began to love and understand the rhythms of my new city, my friends warned me: if you love Seville in the Autumn, you’ll really fall for it in the Spring.

Have you ever visited Seville off-season? 

Places with Encanto: Almohalla 51, Casa Rural and Guest House in Archidona, Malaga

Sending special thanks to the dozens of you who participated in my giveaway with Your Spain Hostel for a 30€ voucher. I’m thrilled to announce that the special winner is Revati!! Please get in touch, guapa, and I’ll relay all of the details! Speaking of staying in Spain…

If only the walls of Almohalla 51, an ancient rural house cum gorgeous boutique hotel in Archidona, Spain, could talk.

“The whole place was decrepit, you see,” David tells us on the quick ride over from Antequera, where he’s met us at the train station. “Just absolutely uninhabitable.”

David and his partner, Myles, bought the house – which hadn’t been lived in for fifty years – and the one adjacent to it, merging the two into a five-bedroom hotel. The 14-person family who sold them the houses were true archidoneses, and the house had the original beams intact. The place is steeped in Andalusian charm.

Upon entering the cozy entrance hallway, David offers us a glass of Mahou beer and some salty olives. “You know,” he starts, topping off his own cerveza, “Myles’s family had been coming down for years and living on the Costa del Sol. There’s this great picture of his mother dancing with the wife of the owner of Mahou before the family sold the company to San Miguel.” Like many British expatriates I’ve met in Spain, there is always some kind of story, some legend, anchoring them to Spain. Myles summered in Estepona during his youth before he and David decided to relocate to Spain permanently, choosing picturesque Archidona as their new home.

Collecting our beer glasses as Lana del Rey crooned from the nearby reading nook, replete with books and old editions of magazines in both Spanish and English, David and Myles offer to show us the rest of the property. Passing through a small courtyard just behind the entrance hall and up a set of stairs, a small but inviting pool was the focal point of another patio and small bar.

“We operate on an honesty policy,” Myles explained. At any hour of the day, guests are invited to help themselves to refreshments, tea or coffee. My guest, Hayley, duly noted that the sweeping views of the nearby mountains and a dip in the immaculately kept pool would be worth coming back for in the summer.

I curiously notice a wrought iron Osborne bull nestled next to a small olive tree just in front of the pool. David, sensing my curiosity, tells me that the tree had actually been brought over from London when they moved to Archidona 18 months ago.

“Does it fruit?”

“Yeah, yeah. But the birds enjoy it more than we do.”

Inside, we are shown to our room. Wood beams stand out against the whitewashed walls, and Andalusian hallmark. Two fluffy twin beds with linens brought in from Mumbai stand next to one another and a weathered wardrobe. A private bathroom features smooth, gorgeous tiles and modern fixtures. Setting down our bags, we continue through to the other guest rooms.

The duo enjoy pointing out each part of the house that had been left over by its previous owners –antique headboards adorning the beds where they’d been born,  an interior patio where horses had been led – as well as the treasures Myles’s mother had found in antique stores and estate sales around England. The other bedrooms each have their own charm, like a split-level with a cavernous shower or a crystal chandelier. I suddenly can’t wait to dive into bed and relax with a book, convinced that the fresh air and sleepy midday would lend to a gorgeous rest.

After lunch in town at Bar Central, we join guests Mary and Thomas, an infinitely friendly and interesting Irish couple, near the fire. Their first trip to Spain, they recount us their tribulations driving on the other side of the road and trying to understand the bullfighting museum in Antequera.

“Dinner’s at half eight girls, but come round earlier for a cocktail.”

Squashing any girlish desires, we refrain from jumping on the small mountain of bed and instead rest up for the evening. The last light of the day is streaming in from the skylight as we read in bed. I drift off for over an hour, lost in the soft mattress and heaps of blankets.

Aperitifs are served promptly at eight, and we all sit round the fire chatting about whatever comes to mind – travels in Spain, language blunders, Mary and Thomas’s work as anthropologists, David and Myles’s favorite scenes as the resident guiris in Archidona. As sweet smells waft from the hallway we are ushered into the dining room.

“Yep, well several of the sisters claim to have been born in this very room,” David had told us earlier, but now the room is crowned by a gorgeous hutch with carvings related to the city of Granada – pomegranates and a knight – and a rustic wooden table whose legs were the originals. While doing the work on the house, Myles used local artisans to give the house a makeover rooted in both old and new.

What follows is one of those epic meals where your wine glass is never empty, your belly is full and the conversation and company can’t be bettered. We had a chutney made of local pears with warm goat cheese and puff pastry, followed by succulent lamb, steamed broccoli and papas a lo pobre. After nearly five hours, a rehashing of Catalonian independence and the draw of the Camino de Santiago (which Hayley and I are walking this summer), and a coffee and gin tonic, Hayley and I barrel into the beautiful Plaza Ochavada for a drink.

The next morning, David and Myles serve the four of us breakfast in the dining room, as rain had hampered plans of having breakfast on the terrace. I dig into coffee, fresh orange juice, natural yougurt with honey and cinnamon, fruit and toast with fig jam and cheese. David invites us to walk up the hill to the bastions and hermitage, affording us the views of the surrounding countryside. From this vantage point, one can see the nearby provinces of Sevilla and Cordoba, as Archidona is practically in the geographic center of Spain and just 45 minutes from Malaga’s international airport.

David comments on the city’s raucous festivals, from a bullfight in the oval of Ochavada to the pedigree dog shows. Their own dog, Ronny, barrels up and down the hill, bounding around the hermitage where faithful crawl on their knees during Holy Week and to the city walls at the top of the mountain. These walls can talk on their own, too, of course – of the Moorish Reconquista and the rebuilding of one of the city’s most recognizable landmarks.

And we’re listening.

If you go: Almohalla 51 is located in the village of Archidona (Malaga), near the geographical center of Andalusia and the A-92 motorway. Its five bedrooms are charged based on high and low season, and include breakfast, housekeeping and all local taxes. Guests under age 14 are not permitted.

 My stay at Almohalla 51 was graciously provided by David and Myles. All opinions, as always, are entirely my own. If you stay, tell them I sent you!

Sleeping in Spain: A Guide to Accommodation (and 30€ Voucher Giveaway!)

If there’s one thing that’s weathering the Spanish economic downturn (no doubt tied to the weather itself), it’s the tourism industry. Accounting for nearly 11% of 2012’2 GDP, Spain constantly pushes the envelope within the tourism industry and has grown to be the second-largest in the world!

Where will you be pillow hugging tonight?

One aspect that sets Spain apart is its ample offering of accommodation and luxury brands. Iberostar, Melià and Bareclò hotels are considered some of the best brands in the world, and backpackers can find a haven nestled on cobblestone streets or just steps from a private beach. Still, in an ever-changing industry, there’s quite a bit of confusion as to each type of accommodation, and sometimes where to find it at an affordable price (don’t worry, there’s an entrance to a voucher at the end of this explanation!).

The view from the rooftop bar at Seville’s Hotel EME.

Hotels, like in any country of the world, are plentiful and of varying quality. There’s also been a recent surge of new hotels offering boutique accommodation, quirky decor and plenty of character. Spain’s tourism board has instituted a nationwide ranking, using the Q of quality and between 1 and 5 stars. Hotels are marker with a white H and the ranking below. High season is during the summer months, local festivals and Christmas time, so expected steeper prices and less availability.

The Spanish government now controls a network of historic buildings converted into luxury hotels, called paradores. From castles to convents, a night in the sumptuous lodging will typically run you more than an average hotel, but booking during the low season can ensure a one-of-a-kind experience in a historically important building.

Tiles on the outdoor terrace of the parador in Carmona, Andalusia.

Hostels and Albergues  are often considered a common type of backpacker accommodation, they are as varied as one could imagine. Typically, they can be found in city centers and offer beds in shared or private accommodation, shared bathrooms and common areas such as living rooms, rooftop terraces or kitchens. Most beds in a shared dorm are less than 20€ a night, making it an ideal place to meet other travelers through free events and walking tours.

A typical dorm room in hostels. This one is Grand Luxe in Seville.

Slightly nicer than hostels, pensions (pensiones) are more budget-friendly than hotels and are typically smaller, too. Most similar to boarding houses, one can expect loads of hospitality and often meals!

Thanks to Spain’s varied landscape, rural accommodations are becoming popular, particularly for families wishing to escape city life.

A bed at Almohalla 51, a luxury rural house in Archidona, Spain

Apartment Stays are also becoming a popular way to live like a local in larger cities. Available for days, weeks or months, a piso turístico will allow travelers the privacy of their own space while having access to amenities. Typical rates for a month can be between 500 – 800€, depending on the season.

Camping remains a cheap and popular option for staying in Spain, particularly on the coast. Rates are low, even during the summer season, and most offer on-site food and washing facilities.

No joke, I spent a night here in the Islas Cies.

I’ve been fortunate enough to stay in a tent on the pristine Playa de Rodas in Galicia, an ancient piso in front of the Basilica Santa María del Mar in Barcelona and a friendly pensión within earshot of the tingling churchbells of Santa María la Blanca in Seville. My head has rested in sumptuous hotels from Toledo to Valladolid, as well as old fortresses, which is why I’m excited to present you all with my newest giveaway.

I’m teaming up with Your Spain Hostel to offer a giveaway of a 30€ voucher to be used on Your Spain Hostel on any property in any city you’re interested in visiting in Spain. Simply enter by leaving your email address and telling me in the comments where you’d like to travel to in Spain should you win the voucher (extra points if you send a postcard!), or otherwise!
a Rafflecopter giveaway

From a bungalow on the beaches of Ibiza to a casa rural in Cangas de Onís, Your Spain Hostel is your one-stop destination for unique and quality accommodation around Spain. The site also provides discounts on tours, entrance to sites, food and even taxi pick-up! You can win extra entries by following both Your Spain Hostel and Sunshine and Siestas on Facebook and Twitter.

Happy travels for 2013! Where are you headed, and where do you like to rest your head at the end of a long day of tourism and tapas? Got any great recs?


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